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Top 15 Casino Objects of Luck | Lucky Charms for Gambling

Gambling Lucky Charms: 15 Popular Lucky Objects People Often Bring to Casino

If gambling history teaches us anything is that luck and gamble enjoy an almost unbreakable bond. Whether it is superstition or an actual effect, gods of gambling, luck, and fortune seem to enjoy gamblers' insatiable trust in the high power as they call eight black.

If you are a gambler exploring the most powerful good luck charms or are just curious about the relationship between gambling and lucky gems overall, here is a rundown of 15 popular lucky objects people bring to their games believing they'll bring them good fortune and winnings:

Four-leaf Clover

Although historically strongly tied to Irish tradition, the cloverleaf is probably one of the most popular lucky charms worldwide. 

Originally, a three-leaf clover is associated with St. Patrick's Day as a symbolic icon for the Christian Holy Trinity: The God, The Son, and The Holy Spirit. Yet, if the fourth leaf is present, it stands for God's grace and is viewed as the good luck charms that work.

The chance of one coming across a four-leaf clover is 1 in 5076, making the finder extremely fortunate! 

Nowadays, cloverleaf (whether there are three leaves or four) has become an extensively popular theme for online gambling games and one of the most common lucky charm symbols.

Horseshoe

A horseshoe is one of the most powerful good luck charms in folktales around the world, intertwined with tales of luck and fortune. 

The origin of this horseshoe folklore started with Saint Dunstan: namely, instead of nailing a horseshoe on the Devil's horse, he nailed it on the Devil's hoof. The Devil and Dunstan then made a deal with the Devil, promising not to disturb any place with a horseshoe nailed above the main door. 

To protect themselves from being disturbed by the Devil, people started hanging horseshoe on their doors – a tradition that lives in some places to this day. The belief states that pinning a horseshoe upward will collect all the luck inside its "U" shape, while turning it downwards will cause all the luck to go away.

In time, the horseshoe transcended to being more than a luck-bringer to homes; it became a powerful symbol of good luck and fortune in many areas, gambling included. In fact, the horseshoe superstition lives for so long that people are united in believing a horseshoe is one of those good luck charms that work for real. 

Not sure about your superstition level, but if you are keeping a horseshoe around you while gambling, better place it in a U-shaped position to gather luck and increase your chances of winning!

Laughing Buddha

Also known as 'Hotai' or 'Pu-Tai,' the Laughing Buddha is a Chinese 'monk' believed to bring wealth and prosperity to households. Buddha (statue) is chubby by default, and rubbing his belly should grant wishes and bring good luck to households and individuals. 

In recent times, Hotai grew into a lucky charm for gambling, not just household luck. Actually, a laughing Buddha with a pot of gold or gold nuggets in his hands is suitable for people who want more prosperity and wealth.  

gambling lucky charms

Tumi

Tumi comes from Peru; it is an ornate ceremonial axe and the national symbol of this country. Tumi is one of the lucky charms items Peruvians commonly hang on the wall or carry with them.

Although initially used to perform religious sacrifices and trepanation (an ancient surgery form that involved removing a piece of skull) by the Incans and earlier Pre-Incan cultures, Tumi became a symbol of protection and good luck for the people living in this area. Tumi is used as one of the most common good luck charms to win money and is considered one of the real amulets that work.

Hamsa Hand

Hamsa charm or Khamsa is a widely popular Middle Eastern and Western culture symbol, viewed as a protective charm. It is represented as an open palm with an eye in the middle, believed to neutralise the evil eye's effects.

Islam treats Hamza, i.e., the five fingers of the hand, as five pillars of the religion: belief, worship, fasting, almsgiving, pilgrimage. Further, another interpretation is depicting the hand of Fatimah Zahra, Prophet Mohammed's daughter.

In Jewish culture, the hand is the representation of God's hand and five books of the Torah. 

Notwithstanding its religious interpretations, Khamsa is believed to protect and bring good luck. Middle Eastern people find it as one of the most powerful good luck charms. It is often worn in jewellery and placed as wall hangings.

Nazar Boncuğu Amulet

Nazar (Arabic, evil eye) is a blue-eyed amulet, typically made of dark blue, light blue, white and black-coloured glass. It comes in the shape of a circle or a teardrop and can be found abundantly in Turkey's bustling bazaars. 

Real lucky charms like Nazar "work" on deflecting people's jealousy, negative thoughts, jealousy, the ill intention, etc. and protecting those who carry it from "the evil eye". M­ode­rn-day gamblers rely on Nazar to block bad luck and the opponents' negative energies and inspire good fortune to come.

Jin Chan (Three-Legged Toad)

Fengshui practitioners are possibly well familiar with Jin Chan (golden toad) or Chan Chu (toad), lucky charms items known as bearers of good news and good fortune. 

This three-legged, tadpole-tail creature with a pair of bright red eyes and a coin in its mouth is believed to appear during a full moon near households that will soon receive good news, money, or any form of wealth. These good luck trinkets are also known to ward off bad luck.

Gamblers perform various rituals with their Jin Chans – while some put chips or lottery tickets under their toad statue to maximise their chances of winning others' carry around and displaying it before hitting a slot game. 

Whatever your personal ritual with lucky objects may be, let us hope they protect your wealth and ward off bad luck! 

Cat's Eye Gem

Cat's Eye Gem is a popular lucky charm for gambling and a talisman known to ward off ghosts, the evil eye, and other harmful things in your life. Suggestive of its name, the gemstone resembles a cat's eyes and is also known to be an amulet for gambling luck. In particular, lucky trinkets like Cat's Eye Gem guard wealth by reducing money loss and making the business stable.

Keep them in your pocket, wallet, or anywhere close to you when playing – maybe there'll be some dazzling fortune coming your way!

Maneki Neko

Yet another cat-like amulet among common lucky charms for life and gamble, Maneki-Neko is the Japanese talisman believed to attract good luck and fortune to its owner. This "beckoning cat" supposedly brings like by waving in (beckoning) with its little paw. 

Being one of the most popular casino charms in Asia and considered one of the good luck charms that work, Maneki-Neko is usually placed at pachinko parlours as good luck charms to win money, cashier counter of hotel receptions and restaurants.

There are several meanings behind which paw it is holding up. Raising the right paw is to wave in good fortune and money while the left paw is to attract customers to your business. Colours, attire, material, and other aspects of Maneki hold their own interpretation of luck.

Maneki-Neko is very popular among Chinese, which is why it is often mistaken as a Chinese tradition.

Dala Horse

Dala horse is the Swedish traditional lucky charm, going back to the winter of 1716, while King Charles XII waged war army. 

The Dala Horse folk tale explains that thanks to this horse, Swedish soldiers survived winter. However, there was no magic there; they simply used wood to carve wooden toy horses and hand them out to kids whose mothers would, then, treat the soldiers to a warm bowl of soup and shelter. As the exchange was working in their favour, the soldiers began craving horses to barter for food. 

Today, Swedish Dala Horse symbolises luck, perseverance, and good fortune – one of the most prominent good luck charms of this country. Dala Horses generally mean dignity, wisdom, and strength, and many use them as gambling charms, too!

Figa Charm

Originally dating back to the Etruscans in the 6th Century BCE, the Mano Figa has been used throughout history as a good luck charm in many cultures. This symbol is the gesture of the thumb jutted between the pointer finger and middle finger. 

It is most commonly used to insult someone, deny a request, show spite or ward off the evil eye. Due to its origins in Southern Europe or Latin Europe, the gesture was introduced to Latin America, as well.

If you decide to flip someone a Figa Charm, good luck, gamblers – because not all cultures understand this is for luck! Maybe warn them first?

Rabbit's Foot 

If you are wondering how to get lucky at the casino, maybe bring a rabbit's foot because it appears this is one of those good luck charms that actually work.

Rabbit's foot is a familiar lucky charm (not so lucky for the animal itself, though) for virtually all segments of life, including gamblers good luck charms for winning. 

The origins of a rabbit's foot as one of the lucky things to carry for good luck are multifield; while some experts suggest rabbit's foot origins are tied to totemism, others argue that rabbit's feet can protect you from the evil eye as rabbits are born with their eyes open. 

casino lucky charms

Scarab Beetles

Do good luck charms work no one can say for sure, but we do know that people worldwide believe they do, so – there must be something there.

In the case of Scarab Beetles, this ancient lucky charm is based on the dung beetle and symbolises rebirth. Scarab beetles were considered a symbol of luck in ancient Egypt, too. Today, plenty of people use it as casino good luck charms.

Carp Scale

Know anyone from Poland? Well, then they have probably told you about Carp Scale as one of those lucky charms that really work!

Together with some other Central European cultures, it is customary in Poland to eat fish for Christmas Eve dinner then carry scales from a carp as a good-luck charm for the rest of the year in the wallet or purse, or anywhere else. 

The scales are believed to attract wealth, prosperity and good luck throughout the next year. So, if you are planning on gambling (and winning!), maybe pick up some carp scale and see where that takes you!

Alligator Teeth

It might not be your Tooth Fairy's first choice, but gamblers feel like there is something about carrying alligator teeth around – that is, if you are looking to score more luck and money in your gambling adventures. The Alligator Teeth talisman is typical of American folklore, though. 

Animal lovers should know that no alligators are harmed to make these casino good luck charms: alligators shed their teeth naturally, and those teeth are used for amulets.

Conclusion

Human perpetual need for control makes it hard for most to accept that, in gambling, the odds are objectively set, mostly determined by machines (or at least through the theory of probabilities), and are the same for everybody. As the need to believe in something bigger than us is ever-present in the world of gambling, the concept of luck came to life, encouraging many to rely on it for their winnings or justify their losses with the lack of it. 

Today, we rely on gambling horoscope, lucky charms and personal rituals to predict and hopefully bring us a little closer to a win. And while, objectively, there is no definite guarantee that any types of good luck charms will make you luckier or a millionaire, holding on to them can help boost your confidence and instil you with a sense of control. After all, next to their skill, what makes a great gambler is their positive attitude and a mindset that beats the odds!

FAQ:

Do lucky charms really work?

 No matter how superstitious in its base, relying on lucky charms actually works. Researchers find that people who believe luck is on their side feel more "self-efficacy, " which boosts their mental and physical performance. Self-efficacy is the conviction that we're capable of doing what we set out to do.

For instance, many elite athletes are profoundly superstitious and rely on their "lucky ball/lucky shorts/lucky skates",, etc., for their wins. One study shows that people who relied on their lucky trinkets during the game did better than those who didn't. 

This is to say that it is no surprise that gamblers rely on their lucky charms, especially if they are high rollers. In that sense, giving a definite answer on аre lucky charms just superstitions or actual help is rather impossible; after all, this is a matter of personal decision rather than general consensus on the topic. 

How do you attract good luck in gambling?

There is no confirmed method in terms of what to do before going to a casino to attract fortune and good luck in gambling. However, turning to numerous rituals and gambling charms does have a history of helping gamblers get the best of their game (well, for the most part). And however misplaced they might seem in our day-to-day life, they do bring charm and delight to any casino in the world.

You can also bring yourself gambling luck by learning more about the craft of gambling by listening to our podcast episodes, released on Spotify.

What is the luckiest symbol?

Depending on your cultural background, chances are you will have unique lucky charm symbols, different to anyone else's. They may even be similar in their physical representation but carry a different meaning than expected; you may even come up with your own personal lucky symbol to turn to when gambling or just needing more luck that day.

Other than the 15 most popular lucky objects in the world we have listed in this blog, you will find plenty of others, culturally evocative, intriguing, and possibly super fortunate!

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